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Measurement Uncertainty (in a Nutshell) FAQ

By Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering


What does Less than 4 to 1 TUR Mean? FAQ

By Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering


The Importance of Make/Model to Calibration

Authored by Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering

Ever get frustrated with your calibration service provider or internal calibration lab for requiring you to include the make and model of your instrument before quoting and calibrating? This white paper will teach you why having this information is necessary to do the calibration correctly and accurately. It will answer these questions:

  • Why doesn't the instrument description provide enough info?
  • What if there is no model number on the instrument?
  • What does Transcat recommend and why?

Limited Calibration...it's not a dirty word!

Authored by Phil Mistretta, Transcat’s Manager of Metrology/ Deputy Technical Manager

A Good Metrology Practice (GMetP) for a Calibration Service Provider (CSP) is to flag, mark or identify a unit that has NOT been fully calibrated to the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) published specifications. This paper will discuss the quality and business impact on real world applications of this practice. It will discuss reasons a metrology lab may offer, and the reasons a customer may request a limited calibration. The factors, benefits, risks, precautions and actions associated with a limited calibration will be covered from the customer perspective. Additionally, the paper will offer ideas on how to manage equipment with a limited calibration and how to respond to questions during an audit.

Process Accuracy Ratio vs. Process Uncertainty Ratio

Authored By Jeremy Sims, Transcat's Quality Manager

The requirements for the process accuracy may be dictated by the requirements of the expected output of the process or product. The ratio between the process accuracy (i.e., the acceptance limits of the manufacturing process, or it could be the product itself) and the instrument accuracy (i.e., the equipment used to measure the process) is the Process Accuracy Ratio (PAR). Just as a calibration standard’s accuracy is an incomplete representation of a calibration process, the sole use of accuracies of the manufacturing measurement process may omit large errors that could change the outcome of the measurement or test. The measuring process can be impacted by many factors. We will define the inclusion of possible sources of error as uncertainty components of the process and thus more exactly define the ratio as the Process Uncertainty Ratio (PUR).

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Producing Valid Results

Authored by Authored by Phil Mistretta, Transcat’s Manager of Metrology/ Deputy Technical Manager

This paper will provide a general information measurement assurance and risk mitigation. It will also discuss key concepts in designing a measurement assurance program to document whether inspection, test and measurement equipment is capable of producing valid results following Good Metrology Practices (GMetP). The reader should be able to determine if his documentation and test equipment is capable of producing valid results. It is targeted toward FDA regulated industries; however the concepts are applicable to any industry where measurement activities are an important part of the quality system.

Suitability of Instruments

Authored by Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering

Each manufacturer shall ensure that all inspection, measuring, and test equipment, including mechanical, automated, or electronic inspection and test equipment, is suitable for its intended purposes and is capable of producing valid results.”(21 CFR 820.72). While this quote is intended for Medical Device manufacturers, the concept behind it gets to the root of good manufacturing practices for any industry with an interest in minimizing rework, scrap, recall, and/or safety problems in order to maximize profits. And everyone likes more cash . . . well, except her (as Jimmy Fallon states in the Capital One commercial). The problem is some companies don’t make the connection that the instruments that are selected and used to quantify decisions about a process or about their product may be driving one or more of the root causes of these profit pilfering

We will cover different aspects of determining the suitability of instruments, including parameter, range, resolution, accuracy, process tolerances, Process Accuracy Ratio (PAR), Process Uncertainty Ratio (PUR), operator influence, storage/handling and other categories. You should expect to be able to formulate your own definition of Instrument Suitability so that you can compare it to your organization’s current definition or to help your organization develop a definition if it does not currently have one in place.

PCS-What Does This Term on My Report Mean?

Authored by Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering


Benefits of PCS

Authored by Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering


Measurements Reported Out of Context

Authored by Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering


17025 Accreditation

Authored by Keith Bennett, Transcat’s Director of Metrology and Quality Systems

Calibration is a multifaceted process that requires multiple guidelines to ensure integrity and correctness of the finished product. These guidelines should be incorporated into the quality process of any calibration laboratory; accreditation assures this. This paper will answer the questions:

  • What is Accreditation?
  • Why it's important?
  • What are the requirements to provide it?

It's Calibrated... Now What?

Authored by Jeremy Sims, Phil Mistretta & Howard Zion

Now that the customer has received the equipment back from the Calibration Service Provider (CSP) there are potentially pages and pages of data, which leaves many questions. The documentation provided by the CSP should help answer these kinds of questions. It is the customer’s responsibility to ensure the calibration received meets their process requirements. The call lab may or may not know how the customer is using the instrument . . . most likely they don’t.

What is Measurement Traceability?

Authored by Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering

What does it mean for my calibrations to be Traceable? What are the components that make up traceability? Keeping your instruments aligned to the global network of measurement via traceability is the only way you can minimize the risk associated with the instruments you use on a daily basis to make the call as to whether your product, or components of your product within the manufacturing process, are good or bad.

US Industry: Quality Gets a Boost from ILAC (P14 Changes)

Authored by Howard Zion, Transcat’s Director of Service Application Engineering

The number ‘1’ is (or should be) significant to your quality system. Who knew it would become significant in a very different way? On 11/1/11, ILAC (the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation) is mandating that all reported measurements, represented by ISO 17025 accredited testing and/or calibration laboratories, include the lab’s measurement uncertainty for each reported value. This change in reporting requirements aligns industries around the globe with the definition of measurement traceability. Why should you care about these changes? I'll tell you...

As-Found: Out-of-Tolerance... What to do next?

Authored by Phil Mistretta, Transcat’s Manager of Metrology/ Deputy Technical Manager

As-Found: Out-of-Tolerance is a simple, but an incredibly powerful statement. This simple statement of non-compliance will generate a lot more work, very important work that can have far reaching effects. In essence: you have nonconforming material. Your quality system has a procedure for handling non-conforming material, however, this is non-conforming instrumentation used in your process, not material produced by your process, and that is the real concern. Did the instrument affect your product? How much product? How severe is the impact? Is rework of product required? Is a recall of the product necessary?


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